Shining like the stars in the sky,Nagasaki's nightscape reflects the spirit of love,Leaving you mystified.
 Mountains rise up surrounding Nagasaki Port, also known as the Crane Port, and its hillside areas, which rise up sharply from the coastline, create a rich environment for the viewing of some dynamic nightscapes.
The most typical of these is the great panorama to be seen from Mt. Inasa, which is ranked as one of the best three night views in Japan. The observation deck at the top of the mountain is the best way to take in the vast nightscape of Nagasaki. At a height of 333m and its 360-degree view, visitors can see all the lights and landmarks of Nagasaki. Nagasaki also features Mt. Nabekanmuri on the other side of the bay, Glover Garden, the Glover Sky Road, as well as the Tateyama area and Kazagashira Park. Although these may offer limited views when compared to Mt. Inasa, they still showcase some of the amazing attributes of Nagasaki's nightscape.
Panorama Night Views
 So what are these attributes? Put simply, they could be described as like "seeing the night sky reflected in a mirror." The countless, sporadic lights from the houses on the hillsides and the lights from the roads appear to blend into clusters of stars and shapes and constellations begin to form among them. Similar nightscapes can be seen in Kobe (the view of Higashi Nada ward from Rokko Island), but given the fact that you can see this sort of view from almost anywhere in the city, it can be said that Nagasaki has no equal to anywhere in Japan.
 These nightscapes are processed by our sight as both light and dark, but in Nagasaki's case it is the darkness that really shines. When viewing the city at night from Mt. Inasa, you will begin to notice the darkness form shapes such as dragons, birds, butterflies, and hearts. Precisely because of this irregular, abstract nightscape, your imagination and inspiration will start to run wild. If you let your imagination wander even further, the butterfly will start to seem like "Madam Butter fly" and the dragon and horse will recall the life of Sakamoto Ryoma.
Megami Ohashi
 When you first look at the lights, they will merely impress you, but after ten minutes or so you will begin to see shapes. Twenty minutes later one may start to feel the culture, history, and foreign influence of Nagasaki. this nightscape is not only the beauty of the night sky but is a magical mirror that can even unlock changes in our hearts, and it is this that is more than likely Nagasaki's greatest allure.




+Night View Critic
+Night View Producer/Consultant
+Director of the Yakei Isan Secretariat
Trademark Registration "Night View Critic,"
no. 4408194
YAKEI☆EX


Born 1965. Graduated from Department of Tourism, Faculty of Sociology, Rikkyo University.
Worked for Pia and Recruit magazines before becoming freelance. After publishing "Tokyo's Night Views" in 1992, he began working in this field and became the only professional critic of night views in Japan. He is working to establish the field of "Night View Studies," which critiques night views from the academic perspectives of landscape, color psychology, etc. He has authored more than 30 books on night views, and in addition to writing, also works as a producer of tours, restaurants and viewpoint events, consults on real estate, produces town revitalization plans through the development of night views, and appears in newspapers, magazines, on TV, the radio, at events and lectures, and on the internet.He has worked as a night view tourism advisor to Kobe City, the Yokohama Brilliant Way Project, the director of the Yokohama Night View Museum, and to Nagasaki City. He also oversees the Night View Examination project. His most recent publication is "Night Views of the World" (published by Diamond Big).